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Sunday, May 10, 2020

Cast your bread upon the waters 

Ecclesiastes 11 1
Cast your bread upon the waters, for after many days you will find it again.
150 years ago, the Choctaw people collected what was then a grand sum of $170 to send to the people of Ireland, who were starving because of the Potato Famine.  CNN reports that the Choctaw understood starvation because they had experienced it themselves on the Trail of Tears.
Now Irish Times reporter Naomi O'Leary is returning the favour:

Half a million dollars has been raised in Ireland. This isn't the only time that Ireland and the American indigenous people have connected.
The act of kindness was never forgotten, and the solidarity between the Irish and Native Americans has continued over the years.
In 1992, 22 Irish men and women walked the Trail of Tears to raise money for famine relief efforts in Somalia, according to Bunbury. They raised $170,000 -- $1,000 for each dollar the Choctaw gave in 1847. A Choctaw citizen reciprocated by leading a famine walk in Ireland seven years later.
In 2017, the town of Midleton in Ireland unveiled a sculpture commemorating the Choctaw's 1847 gift. In 2018, Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar announced a scholarship program for Choctaw people to study in Ireland while he was visiting the tribal nation in Oklahoma.
The GoFundMe donations are just the latest example of the longstanding relationship. As one Irish donor on the fundraising page wrote:
"You helped us in our darkest hour. Honoured to return the kindness. Ireland remembers, with thanks."
It reminded me of the Nova Scotia Christmas Tree that is send each year to Boston in gratitude for the help that came from Boston after the Halifax explosion:

People will never forget those who helped when they needed it the most.

Recommend this Post at Progressive Bloggers | 2 comments

2 Comments:

Just in time for the Ottawa Tulip Festival, courtesy the kind people of Holland. https://www.ottawatourism.ca/ottawa-insider/canadian-tulip-festival/

By Anonymous Anonymous, at 5:46 pm  

Thanks - I hadn't realized that the tulip festival related to the Liberation of Holland.

By Blogger Cathie from Canada, at 11:53 pm  

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